Eczema

Eczema (eg-zuh-MUH) is the name for a group of conditions that cause the skin to become red, itchy and inflamed. Eczema is very common. In fact, more than 30 million Americans have some form of eczema. Eczema is not contagious. You can’t “catch it” from someone else. While the exact cause of eczema is unknown, researchers do know that people who develop eczema do so because of a combination of genes and environmental triggers. When an irritant or an allergen from outside or inside the body “switches on” the immune system, it produces inflammation. It is this inflammation that causes the symptoms common to most types of eczema. Though there are several distinct types of eczema, it is possible to have more than one type at a time.All types of eczema cause itching and redness, but some may also cause your skin to blister, “weep,” or peel.

Causes

The specific cause of eczema remains unknown, but it is believed to develop due to a combination of genetic and environmental factors. Eczema is not contagious. Children are more likely to develop eczema if a parent has had the condition or another atopic disease. If both parents have an atopic disease, the risk is even greater.


Types of Eczema

There are many different types of eczema Allergic contact dermatitis: This is a skin reaction following contact with a substance or allergen that the immune system recognizes as foreign.

Treatment

There is no cure for eczema. Treatment for the condition aims to heal the affected skin and prevent flare-ups of symptoms. Doctors will suggest a plan of treatment based on an individual's age, symptoms, and current state of health. For some people, eczema goes away over time. For others, it remains a lifelong condition. Home care There are numerous things that people with eczema can do to support skin health and alleviate symptoms, such as:

Medications

There are several medications that doctors can prescribe to treat the symptoms of eczema, including:



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