Dark Circles & Puffiness Around Eyes

Periorbital dark circles (also known as dark circles, infraorbital venous stasis or periorbital hyperpigmentation) are dark blemishes around the eyes. There are many causes of this symptom, including heredity and bruising. Fatigue is the most common cause of dark circles under your eyes. Sometimes, what appears to be dark circles under your eyes may merely be shadows cast by puffy eyelids or hollows under your eyes that develop as a normal part of ageing.

Some of the most common causes of true under-eye circles are


First, let’s understand how dark circles appear. We have tiny blood vessels, which are like a web under the skin. But these capillaries are so fine that the red blood cells queue up to pass through; in the process, some of them leak in the surrounding area. Enzymes are produced during the cleaning up session. The breaking down of these red blood cells leaves them black and blue. The reason why this is so visible is that the skin around the eyes is the thinnest.

Common reasons for dark circle:

Ageing - The skin under the eyes is thin and delicate, to begin with. As we grow older, the skin around the eyes becomes thinner making blood vessels more prominent, causing dark circles. Genetics - Hereditary and genetics can also play a big role in the development and dominance of dark circles around the eyes. Nutritional deficiency - Dark circle around the eyes can be due to poor nutrition. A healthy and nutritious diet filled with vitamins like A, C, K, E and nutrients can help to get rid of dark circles. Sleep deprivation and tiredness - A lack of sleep or excessive tiredness results in pale skin, making blood under the skin become more visible and appear more blue or darker. Smoking and drinking - Late night parties, smoking and drinking can play havoc with your skin and result in dark eye circles. Dark eye circles could be a sign of loss of water from the body (dehydration) due to excessive drinking and intake of caffeinated drinks.

Sun exposure - Increased exposure to the sun can draw pigmentation of the skin’s surface and create dark circles. Long sun exposure produces more melanin around eyes than usual, giving them a darker colour. There are two main layers of skin, the outer layer of skin known as the epidermis and an inner layer known as the dermis. When excess melanin is being made in the epidermis it appears brown, and when there is more than usual melanin in the dermis it looks blue or blue-grey. Hormonal changes - In women, the skin undergoes lots of changes during the phase of pregnancy and menstruation, causing darkening under the eyes. Allergies - Any condition that causes the eyes to itch may contribute to darker circles due to rubbing or scratching the skin around them. Apart from that, some food allergies can also cause the area under the eyes to appear darker. In fact, dark circles in children often indicate allergy problems. Research also suggests that dark circles are linked to anaemia, and liver diseases. Dark circles and anaemia - Iron deficiency is one of the most common causes of inexplicable dark circles in many cases, which can be treated by making simple changes in your diet. Low iron levels are the most common form of anaemia and results in poor oxygenation in body tissues due to low supply of oxygenated blood. Thus, always take a balanced diet rich in green leafy vegetable, dairy products and all types of fruits to keep your body healthy.

Dark circles and dehydration - Dehydration is one of the most common reasons for dark circles under the eyes. The reason is the close proximity to the skin underneath the eye in relation to the underlying bone. When the body does not have a proper amount of water, the symptoms are often evident in this specific area. Thus it is advisable to have at least 8-10 glasses of water and include fresh fruit daily. It is also advisable to restrict the intake of caffeinated drinks such as tea, coffee, alcohol and other caffeinated drinks as it aggravates dehydration.

Be gentle with your makeup remover

Consider your under-eyes as sensitive skin even if you may not necessarily have sensitive skin. Undereye skin is among the thinnest on the body, so any trauma or irritation can cause skin inflammation.

Sleep more, or at least get more restful sleep

The cheapest way to reduce the appearance of undereye bags is to get on a regular sleep routine of seven to eight hours per day. And don't drink alcohol a few hours before bedtime.

Avoid excess salt in your diet

It's common knowledge that sodium can cause you to retain water, but did you know the bloat sodium causes in the body can also cause puffiness under your eyes? Yep — you can retain water even under your eyes. Ridding your diet of excess sodium can help combat bags under your eyes. Your eyes will thank you for cutting back on salt.



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